si-blog

Talking Jesus doll

Posted Nov 15, 2006 in Miscellaneous, Religion.

A Jesus doll

United States Marines have been giving away toys to needy children through Toys for Tots since 1947. Over the years, they have collected and given away hundreds of millions of toys.

Presumably in an attempt to brainwash innocent children with their bullshit, one2believe offered to donate 4000 of their ridiculous talking Jesus dolls to the cause. Bill Grein, vice president of Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, wisely refused the offer. “We can't take a chance on sending a talking Jesus doll to a Jewish family or a Muslim family,” he said. He added that “Kids want a gift for the holiday season that is fun.” Amen!

Children are not born religious. There is, for example, no such thing as a Christian baby. They become religious by exposure, primarily through their parents. Religious fanatics are always looking for ways to propagate their lies, and pretending to do a public service by donating these toys is a perfect cover for their activities.

Comments

  1. Gravatar

    You make a valid point and I fully agree with you. However, I have to wonder how many of those non-religious Muslim and Jewish children live in families that celebrate Christmas in any way. I grew up in a Christian environment and never participated in any celebrations pertaining to other religions. Do Jewish kids often get Christmas presents? Do little Muslims get Easter eggs? I'd be bloody surprised. I say give them little talking prophets to use as target practice for their remote control tanks. Maybe they'll get it out of their system while young and grow up to be a part of normal society!

    Posted by Adrian on Nov 16, 2006.

  2. Gravatar

    Adrian, I have a hard time following what you are trying to say. The end of the year has always been, in a way or another, a time for celebration in most cultures/religions. Not everybody celebrate Christmas (that is, the birth of Jesus Christ), but Christians. The rest celebrates the end of the year and the beginning of a new one. With parties, and presents, and a tree (or whatever) that has nothing to do with religion for them.

    Jews celebrate their own religious events (Hanukkah), as well as Muslims, and everyone in between. There are not eastern eggs for Muslims, of course. At least not with the Christian meaning on them. Just use your logic mate.

    And what kind of stupid idea is that, of giving religious figures to kids to destroy? What remote control tanks are you talking about? The kids who would normally receive the hideous dolls are those who doesn't have anything better. "... get it out of their system while young and grow up to be a part of normal society!" WTF??!!

    Dude, your whole comment is pretty senseless. Other than that, a talking Jesus doll would make any kid cry. It would represent a very sad end of year present for any kid. It is, to sum it up, pure rubbish.

    Posted by David Collantes on Nov 17, 2006.

  3. Gravatar

    Although I come from a family that is basically Roman Catholic and Anglican in makeup, I am an atheist. Despite that, I enjoy celebrating Christmas and Easter. I don't find the word "Christmas" offensive in any way, because I believe the significance of the word has outgrown its original context.

    For me, Christmas has nothing whatsoever to do with religion. As far as I am concerned, Christmas is for sharing time and/or gifts with family and friends. Likewise, Easter is a time for family to get together and give each other chocolate eggs (preferably made from British chocolate), chocolate bunnies, or whatever.

    One blog I was reading suggested that the talking Jesus dolls could be "dressed up in Barbie clothes" and stuff, which made me laugh. One Christian website complained that Christmas is "for the baby Jesus" only, and that nativity-related toys should have been donated instead. How ridiculous is that?

    The important thing to understand here is this: I have no objection to religious themes dominating this time of year. If all these millions of deluded folk want to go that way, I'm not going to do anything to stop them. MY objection is about trying to brainwash little kids. These people were trying to use the cover of "charity" to try to propagate their religious doctrine. They were trying to influence the children of other folks who cannot afford gifts for their kids. That is absolutely disgraceful.

    Posted by Simon Jessey on Nov 17, 2006.

  4. Gravatar

    Whatever your religious belief, I think its important to keep things in context here. The idea that some Jewish family or Muslim family will end up with this doll in his/her child's stocking is a valid argument.

    My personal view is, as a Christian, it is important that we do not offend. Also I believe the Bible clearly states that there should be no graven images made of anything in heaven, thus to even depict "Jesus" in a doll is a bad idea. Know one who is currently walking this earth has ever seen him, and so we should stop depicting him in images that are likely to be false likeness. This could be blasphemous!!

    I can't tell you how sick I am of seeing society's white guy with long hair as Jesus!!!

    Posted by Twyla on Nov 17, 2006.

  5. Gravatar

    Hey that point about the celebration of Christmas by Muslims is also valid....they don't celebrate, thus no issue there. Hannukah, on the other hand, involves gift giving, I believe, so there may be something there.

    At the end of the day, no one should get a talking "Jesus" doll"...spreading the Bible in other ways is what I would recommend. Christ is no toy!!

    Posted by Twyla on Nov 17, 2006.

  6. Gravatar

    "My personal view is, as a Christian, it is important that we do not offend."

    I agree up to a point; however, I don't believe folks should go out of their way, or give special consideration, to religious people. Religious people are among the most intolerant in today's society, so why should they get special treatment?


    "Christ is no toy!"

    I'm not sure that is very important either. People have no problem with toy fairies or toy aliens, and they are no less credible than the nonsense that revolves around the life of Jesus (if he ever existed at all, which is doubtful). For centuries, the crucifix has been an important symbol for Christians. Many go as far as wearing them around their necks. How many other groups wear (and even kiss!) symbols that represent horrible instruments of torture and murder?

    Posted by Simon Jessey on Nov 17, 2006.

  7. Gravatar

    I think the company did it in good faith (no pun intended) but the Toys For Tots had a valid reason to deny it.

    "Although I come from a family that is basically Roman Catholic and Anglican in makeup, I am an atheist. Despite that, I enjoy celebrating Christmas and Easter. I don't find the word "Christmas" offensive in any way, because I believe the significance of the word has outgrown its original context."

    Didnt you know Christmas was about a portly man who dresses in a red suit and goes through chimneys and enjoys when little kids are on his lap?

    :)

    Posted by James Henry on Nov 18, 2006.

  8. Gravatar

    Rather interestingly, I have read recently that up until 100 odd years ago, when Coke came up with their great piece of marketing of a big fat bloke dressed in red, that the celebration of Christmas was in serious decline and the new year was a much more significant event. It was only when good old capitalism got involved that it become as a significant celebration as it is today.

    In fact, before Christianity came to the world, the Pagans celebrated the period around the 21 December because it was the longest day and obviously signified the turning point back to spring and summer.

    That was why Christians chose to celebrate the birth of the bearded one at that time of year. Wisely they chose to highjack an established festival to help spread their made-up story. Good marketing once again.

    Posted by Tim on Nov 20, 2006.